Ho’oponopono and Healing Addictions

It is common knowledge that experiences in our early years play an important role in brain and behavioral development. Ho’oponopono looks at past memories, traumas and stresses (I refer to them as entanglements) as the cause of a diversity of illnesses. The emotional patterns we learn beginning in the womb and then as small children – the first 7 years of our lives – live in our bodies and our minds, and stay with us into adulthood. If we haven’t done the work of “setting things right,” we can pass these on to our children, just as our parents passed their traumas on to us, and their parents to them. This sets up generations of wounds until we don’t even know where the original trauma came from. Unresolved trauma can manifest in a number of ways and one widespread manifestation is addictive behavior.

In my private practice my clients who have experienced trauma, stress, and anxiety at a young age tend to repress their emotions. The root of their problems including drug and alcohol addiction, can be traced to difficult childhood experiences. The parent-child bond is crucial, and when there is abuse, neglect, poverty, or parental stress in a child’s life, emotional and other health issues begin to show themselves.

From the perspective of ho’oponopono addiction is not solely a problem of the addict, the responsibility is shared with family and community. There are many different kinds of addictions including sugar, television, shopping, working, drugs, alcohol and eating. Anything done to excess can be an addiction. Usually the addict is trying to soothe or numb themselves to escape some feeling that they may not even be aware of. In fact most of the time there is no awareness.

The ho’oponopono I practise involves ceremony in conjunction with sharing and bringing awareness to the entanglements in a group setting. The ceremony begins with chant and prayer to call on the deities of healing, and particular plant substances are present as representatives of the deities as well. The group process serves as a safe container for the work to take place, and great care is taken to assure that a state of Aloha is held during the entire process.

The similarities of our traumas is always evident. We all suffer from common wounds and it serves and heals us as we hold space for others in their process of discovery. There is a meeting of our humanity that happens when we become present for each others healing. It is always my honor to facilitate the container as a place of safety and Aloha, where profound healing can take place.

 

 

Comments

  1. Carol Glaws says:

    Hi there,
    Aloha from NJ! Love this article, have addiction issues in my family and hoping ho’oponoopno can help us. Looking forward to getting updates from you! Thank you!
    -Carol

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